Summer Reading & Classroom Supplies

Math IXL Instructions

2019 INFO:

Once you receive an email from your math teacher with summer work expectations, you can follow the instructions below to start your IXL work:

  1. Go to www.ixl.com/signin/pcd
  2. Sign in on top right corner of the screen:
    • Use your PCD username.
    • The password is knights1718.
    • Your PCD username is your full last name, first initial of your first name, and the last two numbers of your class year. For example, if Tom Brady was in the Class of 2019, his username would be: bradyt19
  3. Once signed up, you see your name in the top right corner of the screen for your information to be reported to your teacher. You will not get credit for your work if you do not sign in.
  4. Click on the “Math” tab at the top of the screen
  5. Tab down and click on the math level you will be entering in 2019-2020. See the e-mail from your math teacher for more details, or if you have questions about which level to select.
  6. Once you have selected the appropriate level, select the first highlighted topic and get started. If no skills are highlighted you may be in the wrong grade level. Refer to the email from your teacher for proper grade level.

These assignments will be graded. The grade will be based on amount of time and variety of topics rather than on your Smart Scores. Refer to the email from your teacher describing grade level to click on, expectations, suggested number of hours, a grading rubric and other tips for success.

Middle School

Math 6–8

All Middle School math classes are expected to complete summer math review using the online program, IXL. IXL is a learning site that provides unlimited practice in over 6,000 math topics. IXL breaks down topics into progressive skills for each grade level and content area, and provides immediate feedback with question-specific explanations for every incorrect answer. Based on their math course, students will be emailed a list of topics they are expected to practice over the summer with a goal of at least 70% proficiency in each topic. In order for students to access the system, and for teachers to monitor progress, each student will be assigned an individual IXL account. Information about how to log on will be emailed to students and parents by July 5.

6th Grade Reading

Sixth graders are required to read one book, Hidden Figures (Young Readers Edition) by Margot Lee Shetterly, and complete these related assignments.

6th Grade Science: Create an imaginative and informative game to review the novel Hidden Figures. Be sure to include the following:

-Important quotes

-Interesting trivia or high quality facts

-Terms and definitions from the glossary

-Plot, character, and setting information

-Important messages or themes

Use creative and original materials to design your game. The game can be based upon a standard board game or a card game. However, it should be a unique and artistic creation. Bonus points for using recycled materials in your game design!

Include a clear set of instructions for how to play the game and demonstrate effort by using color and paying attention to detail and neatness in your design. Be prepared to play the game the first week of classes! Students will provide feedback to each other on the games and have an opportunity to make changes as needed for a final draft.

6th Grade English: After reading Hidden Figures, describe each of the four main characters in complete sentences. What is important about each person? What were their lives like? What challenges did they face and how did they deal with them? Write at least one paragraph per character. Rate this book on a scale of one to five – one being poor, with five being excellent. Why did you give it this rating? Who would enjoy this type of book? Finally, make a book cover to hold these entries. On the front cover, include the title, author, and a cover illustration. On the back cover, write a brief synopsis that you have come up with yourself.

7th Grade Reading

All seventh graders will read Fever 1793 by Laurie Halse Anderson and complete these related assignments:

7th Grade English: Draw a detailed map of the setting of Fever 1793. Include Mattie’s home and the coffee house in the map and include other significant places from the story. Be sure to label all of the locations on the map and use detail and color. The map should be drawn on paper a minimum size of 8” x 11” and maximum size of 22” x 28” poster board.

7th Grade Civics: Students will have an in-class essay following a discussion of the novel.

7th Grade Science: Students will begin the year with an assignment that connects to the summer reading book, Fever 1793.

In addition to Fever 1793, seventh graders will select a book from the list below and, in 3-4 typed paragraphs, describe the main character(s), setting and conflict of the novel. Students may select:

Realistic Fiction

  • Ghost Jason Reynolds
  • Booked – Kwame Alexander
  • Hatchet – Gary Paulsen
  • City of Ember – Jeanne Deprau
  • The Fault in Our Stars – John Greene
  • Stargirl – Jerry Spinelli
  • Wonder – R.J. Palaccio
  • Trouble – Gary D. Schmidt
  • The Wednesday Wars – Gary D. Schmidt
  • When You Reach Me – Rebecca Stead
  • The Maze Runner – James Dashner

Historical Fiction

  • Crispin – Avi
  • My Brother Sam is Dead – James Lincoln Collier & Christopher Collier
  • The Watsons Go to Birmingham – Christopher Paul Curtis

Science Fiction

  • Enders Game – Orson Scott Card
  • The Hunger Games – Suzanne Collins

Sports

  • Heat - Mike Lupica

8th Grade Reading

8th Grade English: Students will choose one of the following books: The Chosen by Chaim Potok or A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith. After a discussion about the books, students will have an in-class write on their chosen novel.

8th Grade Rhode Island / U.S. History: Students will read Weetamoo: Heart of the Pocassets, Massachusetts, 1653 (The Royal Diaries) by Patricia Clark Smith. An oral book report will be due during the first week of school. The oral book report should be an audio file or a video recording. The body of the oral book report should be a discussion of the way of life of the Pocasset tribe. Students should address the following sub-topics: Weetamoo’s interaction with her immediate family, tribal food gathering and food preparation practices, religious practices, recreational activities, social activities (includes a re-telling of a story told by one of the elders), inter-tribal relations between the Pocassets and the Wampanoags, and the Pocasset tribe’s relations with the English colonists. The concluding section should be a critique of the book. Naturally, you should point out what you liked and disliked about the book.

Upper School

Modern & Classical Languages

AP Latin: The Aeneid
A test will be given on the text in the first two weeks of school. A practice test will be used to prepare them before the actual assessment.

AP Spanish: Yerma by Federico Lorca
Students should expect to discuss the play in class, and complete a writing assignment in the first two weeks of school.

English

English 9: The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
The book will be discussed and a written assessment (essay and/or test) will be given in the first two weeks of classes.

English 10: Students will read Exit West by Mohsin Hamid and will write an essay on the book during the first two weeks of the trimester.

English 11 & 12: Students will be enrolled in trimester electives, and there is no summer reading assigned.

AP English: Washington Black by Esi Edugyan and Exit West by Mohsin Hamid. Students will read both and must submit an essay on each assignment. Students will also have a vocab test on literary terms during the first week of school. Details and the list of literary terms will be available to the class on their PlusPortal page.

History

History 9: Chocolate: Sweet Science & Dark Secrets of the World’s Favorite Treat by Kay Frydenborg
Students should be prepared to discuss the book in the first two weeks of class. As they read, students should consider the following question: “How is this story similar or different to other history stories you have read before?”

History 10: My Grandmother: An Armenian-Turkish Memoir by Fethiye Cetin. All students will write an in-class essay on the book in the first few days of school.

AP European History: AP Euro students will read the first two chapters of the textbook (“The Late Middle Ages” and “The Renaissance and Discovery”) over the summer and should prepare to write a DBQ in the first week of school.

U.S. History: Students should read Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi and be prepared for an in-class writing assignment and discussions in the first two weeks of school.

AP U.S. History: Students will receive specific information about this assignment by e-mail, and the details will also be available on PlusPortals. There are two components to the summer assignment. First, there is an experiential piece requiring students to visit and write about two historical sites in New England. Second, there is a traditional reading assignment that includes choosing from a list of books connected to U.S. History and writing an essay.

AP Art History: No summer reading assigned—instead, students will complete a written assignment based on an introductory PowerPoint, which will be posted on the class website at http://pcdapah1516.weebly.com. The PowerPoint and the assignment will be available on the website by July 15 and Ms. Mennucci will email the class with the site password. The completed assignment will be due in class on the first day of school and will count as a quiz grade.

Math

The majority of math classes (see exceptions below*) are expected to complete summer math review using the online program, IXL. IXL is a learning site that provides unlimited practice in over 6,000 math topics. IXL breaks down topics into progressive skills for each grade level and content area, and provides immediate feedback with question-specific explanations for every incorrect answer. Based on their math course, students will be emailed a list of topics they are expected to practice over the summer with a goal of at least 70% proficiency in each topic. In order for students to access the system, and for teachers to monitor progress, each student will be assigned an individual IXL account. Information about how to log on will be emailed to students and parents by July 5.

*Exceptions: PreCalculus, Calculus, AP Calculus AB, and AP Calculus BC. These four courses have review instructions/packets listed below.

THE FOLLOWING COURSES HAVE SPECIFIC ASSIGNMENTS IN PLACE OF IXL SUMMER WORK.

Calculus

The following problems are due on the first day of school. They are all review from last year. Each section will be worth a homework grade; so, since I am giving you five sections, your first five homework grades of the year will be determined by these assignments. They will be graded on completion and effort. I purposefully chose all odd problems, so if you need to check your answers, they are in the back of the book. This is a great way to get the year off on the right foot.

You will also be tested on this material in your second week back at school, so if the work is incomplete, this will most likely hurt your first test grade as well.

If you have any specific questions, feel free to email Ms. Sanford. All of this material will be heavily relied upon all year, and after the first two weeks, it will not be extensively reviewed. If you find yourself struggling to get through these problems, I highly recommend that you consider finding someone to help you review this summer.

Textbook information
Title: Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic (AP Edition)
Authors: Finney, Demana, Waits, Kennedy, Bressoud
Publisher & Edition: Pearson, Fifth Edition
ISBN: 0-13-331161-9

  • Section 1.1 – Linear Functions: Pg. 10, Exercises #5, 7, 9, 13, 19, 23, 25, 29, 33, 35, 40, 45, 46, 51
  • Section 1.2 – Functions and Graphs: Pg. 20, Exercises #1, 5, 7, 9, 13, 15, 31, 33, 39, 41, 43, 49, 51, 59, 61
  • Section 1.3 – Exponential Functions: Pg. 26, Exercises #1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 19, 21, 23, 25, 41, 43, 45
  • Section 1.5 – Inverse Functions and Logarithms: Pg. 42 Exercises #1, 5, 7, 13, 15, 19, 23, 33, 35, 37, 39, 43, 53, 55, 57
  • Section 1.6 – Trigonometric Functions: Pg. 50, Exercises #1, 3, 9, 11, 15, 17, 19, 25, 27, 29, 31, 35, 37, 39, 51, 53, 55

Pre-Calculus

We hope you are looking forward to the summer! Below is your summer work assignment for PreCalculus. This

assignment is due the first day of classes, and it will be graded as a quiz. If the summer work is NOT done, five

points will be taken from your grade for each day that it is late. During the first week of school, you will have a

test with similar problems to those detailed in the summer work. This test will help determine if you are placed

in the appropriate math class. For optimal results, it is highly recommended that you complete a portion of the

assignment each week. This ensures that skills are being reinforced regularly and that you do not become

overwhelmed.

Need help?

 Watch a video on Khan Academy: http://khanacademy.org

 Watch a video on Virtual Nerd: http://virtualnerd.com.

 Look for practice problems on your IXL account (if you do not have an IXL account, email

aitken@providencecountryday.org for information)

 Email page@providencecountryday.org with questions regarding the assignment or specific skills.

Review the Examples (left column) in the “Just-In-Time Review” (J-1 to J-26) from your textbook (PreCalculus

Graphs and Models: A Right Triangle Approach, Sixth Edition, © 2017). Then complete the practice problems

(right column) for each section listed:

Just-In Time Section # (please note that these are sections, NOT pages):

6: #1-2 and 7-8

7: #3 and 6-8

9: #2-3 and 6

11: #4-5

12: #1-2 and 4

13: #3-6

14: #1-9 (use the method of your choice)

15: #1-3 (use the method of your choice)

16: #1, 2, 4, 6 and 8

17: #5-8

19: #3-4

20: #1-2

21: #1-4

22: #1-2

23: #1 and 3

25: #2 and 16

26: #1-2

28: #1-3

AP Calculus AB

Please download this PDF file for your summer assignment.

AP CALCULUS BC (for students who completed AB)

Please download this PDF file for your summer assignment.

AP CALCULUS AB/BC (combined)

Please download this PDF file for your summer assignment.

Science

Conceptual Physics A: World As I See It by Albert Einstein
Students are expected to read and summarize one chapter by the end of the first week of school.

Conceptual Physics B: Students will read selections from Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! Adventures of a Curious Character by Richard Feynman; a PDF with the selected readings will be sent by email. Students should be prepared to discuss general themes and there will be a written assignment in the first two weeks of class.

Chemistry & Honors Chemistry: The Chemistry classes are going to produce a chemistry trivia game. We will generate a set of questions about each of the first 100 elements and use those to play the game. For the summer reading assignment, each student will be asked to write out 5 questions about 4 different elements that will be assigned to each individual student. Trivia questions should all come from the summer reading book, Nature's Building Blocks by John Emsley. More details about the assignment will be sent by email.

Honors Biology: Hot Zone by Richard Preston
Students should be prepared to discuss general themes and there will be a written assignment in the first two weeks of class.

AP Biology: Demon in the Freezer by Richard Preston
Students should be prepared to discuss general themes and there will be a written assignment in the first two weeks of class.

PSSC: Advanced Topics in Physics: Knocking on Heaven’s Door: How Physics and Scientific Thinking Illuminate the Universe and the Modern World by Lisa Randall. Students should be prepared to discuss general themes and there will be a written assignment in the first two weeks of class.

Environmental Science: None

Classroom Supplies

6th Grade Supplies

  • 1.5” binder (1 – Science*)
  • 2” binder (1 – English/Reading)
  • 1” binders (2 – History & Latin)
  • Loose-leaf notebook paper
  • Sheet protectors (4-6)
  • Tab dividers (10-15)
  • Scientific calculator
  • Flash cards & file box to store cards
  • Post-It notes (2 packs)
  • Accordion file
  • SD card (8GB or more) for storage of files for Digital Arts

*Science students will be charged $9 for a course-specific lab notebook that will be distributed in class.

7th Grade Supplies

  • 1.5” binder (1 – Science*)
  • 2” binder (1 – English)
  • Spiral notebook (2 – Civics & Languages)
  • 1 Mead composition book
  • Loose-leaf notebook paper
  • Sheet protectors (4-6)
  • Tab dividers (10)
  • Pocket folders (3 – Languages, Math & Civics)
  • Scientific calculator (may also be used for Science)**
  • Flash cards (4–6 packs of 3x5 cards) & file box to store cards
  • SD card (8GB or more) for storage of files for Digital Arts
  • Graphing Notebook (PreAlgebra)

*Science students will be charged $9 for a course-specific lab notebook that will be distributed in class.

**Students in Algebra 2 or higher will need a TI 83 Plus Calculator

8th Grade Supplies

  • 1.5” binder (1 – Science)
  • 2” binder (2 – History & English)
  • Spiral notebook (1 –Languages)
  • 1 Mead composition books (2 – Science & English)
  • Loose-leaf notebook paper
  • Sheet protectors (60)
  • Tab dividers (10)
  • Pocket folders (3 – Languages, Math, & Civics)
  • Scientific calculator (may also be used for Science)*
  • Flash cards & file box to store cards
  • Post-It notes (2 packs)
  • SD card (8GB or more) for storage of files for Digital Arts
  • Graphing Notebook (PreAlgebra)

*Students in Algebra 2 or higher will need a TI 83 Plus Calculator

Upper School Supplies

Organization is a necessity for all Upper School students. As students move from class to class and from teacher to teacher, each student needs to develop a system that works best for him or her. For each subject area, students will be expected to:

  • Manage time and daily class work. All students should have a planner or agenda book to note daily assignments, upcoming assessments, and any other school-related dates and deadlines. Students may also effectively use a Google calendar or other electronic form of planner, but we would recommend a hard copy planner or agenda; all 9th graders will receive a planner on Orientation day in September.
  • Take notes. For each class, students should have a way to take in-class notes and keep them organized by subject.
  • Manage handouts. Teachers may hand out supplementary material, assignment instructions, or other information in class that students should keep and organize.
  • Revise and review. After in-class tests or quizzes, research papers, lab reports, or any other major assignments are graded and handed back by the teacher, students should have a place to keep this information organized for future revisions or review.

Suggested systems to stay organized (in addition to the planner or agenda book!):

  • Binders: Keep a 3-ring binder for each subject, plenty of loose-leaf notebook paper, section dividers, sheet protectors, and a hole punch. Notes can be taken on the loose-leaf paper; handouts and graded work can be hole-punched and put in the binder for future reference and review.
  • Notebooks and folders: Bring a spiral notebook for each subject area for taking notes, and pocket folders for any handouts. Students may need a separate accordion folder or pocket folders to store graded work since it will accumulate as the year progresses.
  • Laptops/Tablets: Some students may prefer to take notes on laptops and organize notes on their device with folders for each class. While many successfully use devices for this purpose, students should have at least a spiral notebook available should any technical difficulties arise, and a folder to manage any handouts.
  • Other suggestions: Index cards to make flash cards for studying, highlighters, and a flash drive.

In addition to using the suggestions above and preparing a system to stay organized in all academic classes, there are some courses with specific supplies required. Those courses and supplies are:

  • Digital Arts: Students enrolled in yearbook, photography, or advanced media should supply their own SD card (8GB or more) for storage.
  • Math – all courses: Students should always have plenty of pencils, and access to graph paper. Calculators are recommended for all math classes, with the following recommendations:

    • Scientific Calculator (TI-36x suggested) is sufficient for: Math 6, Math 7, Pre-Algebra, Algebra 1 (A & B), Algebra 2A, Geometry A, Advanced Algebra 3 & Trig., Topics in Math
    • TI Graphing Calculator (TI-83 Plus suggested*) is required for: Algebra 2B, Algebra 2 Honors, Geometry B, Pre-Calculus, Calculus, AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC
  • Science – Chemistry, Honors Chemistry: clear metric ruler, and scientific calculator. A phone with a calculator feature is not appropriate for in-class use. If you do not need a TI 83 Plus for math (see above), an inexpensive scientific calculator would be sufficient (recommend the TI 36x).
  • Science – Conceptual Physics and PSSC: Advanced Topics in Physics: clear metric ruler, scientific calculator, graph paper, and colored pens or pencils. A phone with a calculator feature is not appropriate for in-class use. If you do not need a TI 83 Plus for math (see above), an inexpensive scientific calculator would be sufficient (recommend the TI 36x).
  • History – AP Art History: Index cards and a file box for the cards.

*Other acceptable models of a TI Graphing calculator include: TI-84 Plus CE, TI-84 Plus Silver Edition, TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition, TI-84 Plus, TI-83 Plus, TI-Nspire CX, TI-Nspire CX CAS, TI-Nspire with Touchpad, TI-Nspire CAS with Touchpad, TI-89 Titanium, or TI-89.